Hello Dreamers & Readers,! Welcome to July! Happy new month.

I have decided my first review this new month will be this book “The Hate U Give – Angie Thomas” I read it awhile back but needed time to process all the feelings this book brought to life in me. Real life feelings, not because I AM BLACK but because I am human and every human should have these feelings after reading a book like this that centers around real life happenings. This book hurt my Heart.

You know a book is going to be brilliant when it makes you cry in the first 2Chapters. This is one of the best YA books I’ve read in recent times.
Everything you read here is just my personal views and take and it is ok if you feel differently about it.

it is not a case of US against YOU or YOU against US, but a simple case of US AGAINST US.

This book has made me feel every single possible emotion at the same time. It was truly incredible and I have SO MUCH to say about it but I just wish and hope everybody gets to read this book and the school system needs to adopt this book and make it available to kids.

ABOUT THE BOOK

“What’s the point of having a voice if you’re gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn’t be?”

The Hate U Give is about a sixteen year old girl named Starr who lives in a ghetto and what is considered to be a dangerous neighborhood, Garden Heights and commutes to a fancy private school in a totally different and more Urban community where she becomes the non-confrontational, approachable, and not-angry-black girl in Williamson. One evening, Starr and her childhood friend Khalil leave a party and got pulled over by a white cop on the way home. The cop shoots and kills Khalil, even though he was unarmed just because of the color of his skin. Walls crumbled when she witnessed the death of her childhood friend and Nothing will ever be the same again.

“Nobody understands! I saw the bullets rip through him. I sat there in the street as he took his last breath. I’ve had to listen to people try to make it seem like it’s okay he was murdered. As if he deserved it. But he didn’t deserve to die, and I didn’t do anything to deserve seeing that shit!”

After a while, Khalil’s death becomes a national headline against police brutality, social injustice, and inequality and Starr is thrown into turmoil. The neighborhood she grew up in wants justice, as does Starr. But being the sole witness to Khalil’s murder comes with danger, from drug lords where she lives, and the police everywhere else. Starr had already felt pulled between two worlds before Khalil’s death, and now she doesn’t know what choices to make.

PERSONAL REVIEW

“People like us in situations like this become hashtags, but they rarely get justice.” “It’s dope to be black until it’s hard to be black.”

What I admire about The Hate U Give is that Thomas provides various perspectives that allow readers to examine and discern the truth from varying point-of-views regarding Khalil’s death and actions. Although harrowing, Thomas writes with unflinching candor and intricate details (No Sugarcoating) that give the novel some verisimilitude that is relatable to various social issues and themes in this present age and time.

“This is about Us, with a capital U; everybody who looks like us, feels like us, and is experiencing this pain with us despite not knowing me or Khalil.”

Thomas wrote a memorable debut novel that is palpable, timely, socially relevant, gut-wrenching, poignant, thought provoking, and phenomenal! Witness the power of one, authentic, resonant voice that drowns the hate the world gives.

This is a book that I really hope becomes a worldwide phenomenon. We’ve seen similar stories on the news many times, throughout the years, but I feel the youth of the world have not been given this story in a relatable way. There should be more books like this out there.

Starr is what made this book come alive for me. Her voice, the way she tells her story is extraordinary. Every single moment of this book I felt for this girl: I wanted to stand beside her, I wanted to cheer her on, I wanted to hold her, I wanted to be her and maybe take away some or all of the burdens she carries. She was faced with circumstances and choices no one her age should ever have to face. Confronting these events were hard for her, and while she didn’t always do what everyone told her to, she stayed true to herself and handled it the best she could.

 “Brave doesn’t mean you’re not scared, Starr,” she says. “It means you go on even though you’re scared. And you’re doing that.”

I felt so many things while reading this book, it really does pull on several different emotions. Being Angie Thomas’ debut novel I am floored by her talent, many writers work their entire life to bring this kind of voice to their characters. I can boldly say I will forever be in her corner.

FINAL THOUGHTS

“Sometimes you can do everything right and things will still go wrong. The key is to never stop doing right.”

Starr is all of us. Even if we haven’t seen the horrors she’s witnessed, the potential that she shows of not being silenced is the thing that makes her so relatable. 

It would be so easy to quit if it was just about me, Khalil, that night, and that cop. It’s about way more than that though. It’s about Seven. Sekani. Kenya. DeVante.
It’s also about Oscar.
Aiyana.
Trayvon.
Rekia.
Michael.
Eric.
Tamir.
John.
Ezell.
Sandra.
Freddie.
Alton.
Philando.
It’s even about this little boy in 1955 who nobody recognized at first – Emmett.
The messed-up part ? There are so many more.

So no, this book isn’t about black people or white people or Muslims or anyone else. She addresses the struggles of interracial relationships. She puts the spotlight on patchwork family dynamics which are present throughout the book. She clashes the realities of parental support and parental neglect. She also takes a stand on toxic friendships and unhealthy group dynamics.

It’s about you and me. Its about what we do, and the choices we make.
The point of this book is to help us stand against violence, biases and racism and prejudices regardless of the color of our skin and the accent of our voices. 

It shows us that we can move mountains, as long as we’re brave enough to take that first step towards change, trying to make this world a better place for all of US.

FOR ALL THAT AND MORE, I AM RATING THIS BOOK 10/10 AND THE MUCH DESERVED 5🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟

What are you waiting for? lol😁

I cannot think of a single person I would not recommend this book for.

The Hate U Give is a gem you shouldn’t miss in your collection. I’ve rarely been this impressed by a YA contemporary and a debut, at that. So, if you haven’t read it, go read it, and if you haven’t bought it, go buy it, and if you haven’t added it to your tbr, you’d better go smash this beauty onto your tbr. 📚